Bogawanthalawa

The needs in Bogawanthalawa

Education
Poor school attendance is caused by many factors, including inadequate nutrition, illness, and difficult economic conditions. There are not enough resources, qualified teachers, or classroom space to accommodate the community's students. Schools are not equipped with laboratories, libraries, furniture, sanitation facilities, or drinking water, nor can they meet the needs of children with disabilities.

The conditions of preschools are poor and general school dropout rates are high. Girls often stay home to look after younger siblings while their parents are at work.

Health Care
Diarrhea, acute respiratory infections, and anemia are common in Bogawanthalawa. Over a third of children in the community are malnourished and maternal and infant mortality rates are high.

Child Protection
Human rights violations are widespread in Bogawanthalawa, and children are particularly vulnerable to sexual abuse and exploitation. Children as young as 10 years old are sent to urban centres, where they work as domestic servants and are taken advantage of. Families have a deep desire to improve their children's quality of life, but few have the knowledge and skills they need to make significant and lasting changes.

Water and Sanitation
Most families in Bogawanthala are forced to drink unsafe water. Poor hygiene and sanitation practices result in health issues and environmental harm.
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Bogawanthalawa's Community News

Thanks to the generous support of donors, we’re making great progress toward the well-being of children and their families. These are a few of the areas we focused on in the past year: 


The Bogawanthalawa community is located in the central hills of Sri Lanka, about 140 kilometres from Colombo, the capital city. The area is famous for its tea. About 70% of people here work on tea estates. Landslides have a negative impact on livelihoods, affecting not only plantations but houses and other crops as well.

Families working on tea estates live in tiny, semi-permanent houses that are often no bigger than 72 square feet. Up to three generations of family live together, and there is serious overcrowding and a lack of privacy, especially for girls and women. Faced with a skyrocketing cost of living, families are often unable to meet their basic needs on a monthly income of less than CAD $40.
  • 180 individuals learned about child rights and protection issues to help ensure children's safety and participation
  • 1,547 young people are leading or attending child parliaments to advocate for their rights and influence local decisions
  • 36 child parliaments are empowering young people to advocate for their rights and participate in community decisions
  • 180 people learned how to work with local authorities and influence decisions to improve services and child well-being    
  • 2,263 children and youth are improving their learning through tutoring and extracurricular activities like clubs and camps
  • 49 teachers and volunteers learned child-friendly teaching methods to improve the quality of education for children
  • 8 people received daily essentials like shelter, cooking sets and hygiene kits, protecting families during emergencies
  • 1,200 children affected by disaster or displacement were protected and cared for at child friendly spaces
  • 1 child friendly space met the unique needs of children in emergencies, while providing safety and psychosocial support
  • 1,166 parents and caregivers learned how to provide proper nutrition to their children and protect them from diseases
  • 560 malnourished children were enrolled in nutritional programs and monitored to ensure they are growing healthy
  • 387 women were counselled on how to properly care for themselves and their babies during and after pregnancy
  • 225 people including children learned to protect themselves against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections
  • 141 health workers and volunteers were trained to provide quality health services, especially for women and children
  • 5 health centres were improved with renovations, medical equipment or supplies to better care for children and families
  • 125 farmers learned techniques to improve crop and livestock production to better provide for their children and families
  • 1,225 individuals including children have safe water for drinking and cooking thanks to new or repaired water sources
  • 2 water sources are providing access to safe water and protecting children and families against waterborne diseases
  • 780 people including children are benefitting from latrines and have better access to sanitation
  • 165 latrines in homes, schools or the community are providing improved access to sanitation for children and families
  • 800 children and adults learned about the importance of water safety, proper sanitation and hygiene to stay healthy
  • 15 people were trained on how to repair and maintain water sources, ensuring safe water access for children and families
Education
To ensure children can access and benefit from quality education, World Vision will assist the community to:
  • Establish academic competitions, study groups, and libraries.
  • Encourage the development of a healthy learning environment at home.
  • Increase teachers access to resources and training to improve the quality of instruction students receive.
  • Improve schools capacities to educate vulnerable children and students with disabilities.
  • Renovate schools and provide them with learning materials, proper water and sanitation facilities, and vegetable gardens.
  • Partner with local authorities to ensure there are adequate preschool facilities.
  • Improve training for preschool teachers.
  • Teach parents and community members about the importance of early childhood education.

Health Care
With the partnership of Canadian sponsors and the community, World Vision will work to:
  • Partner with the Ministry of Health to strengthen maternal and child health programs.
  • Monitor and rehabilitate malnourished children.
  • Establish nutrition support groups, as well as home gardens, beekeeping, and poultry and goat farming to improve children's nutrient intake.
  • Partner with local authorities to improve health care facilities and staff training.

Child Protection
To ensure children and youth enjoy a safe and protected environment, World Vision will work to:
  • Develop strong local leadership to monitor children's safety and wellbeing in the community.
  • Prevent instances of child labour, child abuse, and gender inequality.
  • Train community-based children's rights groups to spread awareness and address child protection issues
  • Support children's programs that promote education, leadership, and conflict resolution.
  • Report cases of abuse and support vulnerable children, including orphans, children with disabilities, and child labourers.

Water and Sanitation
In partnership with families and sponsors, World Vision will work with the community to:
  • Partner with local authorities to improve water quality and sanitation facilities.
  • Raise awareness about the prevention of waterborne diseases.
  • Encourage the protection of local water sources and promote the use of organic fertilizer and composting to prevent water contamination.
  • Support the establishment and management of water purification programs.
  • Establish proper drainage and garbage disposal systems.
  • Build sanitary latrines.

Economic Development
To ensure parents in Bogawanthalawa can provide for their families, World Vision will partner with the community to:
  • Establish and support self-help groups and community-based savings and credit groups.

Explore Bogawanthalawa

current conditions

To protect the privacy of children, this map shows only the general area of the community, not the exact location.

Life cycle of a sponsorship community

Bogawanthalawa,  is in Phase 2

PHASE 2: Evaluate and grow

We monitor progress and make adjustments to meet goals. More community members become involved, lead projects and gain ownership of their success.