Childview

Goats and Gardens in Nkayi

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First goats ... 


The goats now outnumber the people, which is good for a group of 11 community members who started a goat-caring-and-sharing project in the Nkayi community in Zimbabwe last spring.

In order to join the group, each member had to donate a goat—a sign of commitment to the venture. They share responsibility for caring for the goats with the goal of selling them after they give birth. Then the group will share something else—profits, which will support the members’ families, including 40 children. With the money earned, group members will be able to pay for school fees, house repairs and other necessities. But for the group to succeed, it needed more livestock.

World Vision helped buy more goats and connected the group to government agencies that showed the members how to care for the goats and how the animals reproduce. The group plans to be around for a while, so the training was designed to make the members self-sufficient.

There are now 40 goats, 35 of which are pregnant. Sipho, the community facilitator for the project, says if everything goes according to plan, the group will sell the mother goats for about $50 each. World Vision has put the group in touch with hotel restaurants to be buyers of the goats. “So next time you come to the Victoria Falls, and you’re enjoying your goat meat, it could be coming from here,” says Method Ndlovu, World Vision’s Nkayi community manager​.

Recently, Sipho showed Childview around at the goat project. Here we share some photos from our visit.


An overhead of the goat pen.
An overhead of the goat pen.​


Sipho with a goat outside its home, the pen.
Sipho with a goat outside its home, the pen.​


Sipho stands among some of the goats.
Sipho stands among some of the goats.​


. . .


Now a garden ...


The greens in the garden were too tempting for the cows and goats to stay away. They’d enter uninvited to snack and to trample on the crops. The damage was setting farmers back in this Nkayi community garden in eastern Zimbabwe. The damage was also threatening the nutrition of children and families who relied on the garden.

One of the garden’s farmers is Masuko, a father of six, who grows tomatoes and a leafy green vegetable similar to Swiss chard. Every time the garden was destroyed, which happened frequently, Masuko, 49, says he’d feel pain. “It was costing me a lot,” he says—time and money. Replanting his crops could take several days and he’d lose the US$10 he’d typically earn each week for selling his veggies to other families.

The garden saw its first crops planted in 1984. Thirty years on, it needed security. Not a guard, but a fence. In January, the farmers installed one after World Vision provided fencing materials they couldn’t afford to buy. Now the cows and goats stay out of the garden.

There are still more improvements possible here. Masuko would like to learn new farming techniques that will make his work easier. But for now, he’ll take the security of the fence.

Recently, Childview visited Masuko at his garden. Here we share some photos from our visit.


Masuko at his community garden.
Masuko at his community garden.​


The newly installed fence keeps a donkey out of the garden.
The newly installed fence keeps a donkey out of the garden.​


Masuko waters the Swiss chard-like leafy green vegetable.
Masuko waters the Swiss chard-like leafy green vegetable.


Masuko continues watering—his plot in the garden takes a bit of time to get the job done.
Masuko continues watering—his plot in the garden takes a bit of time to get the job done.



Read the Winter 2014/2015 issue cover story from Nkayi »»

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This article appears as part of the Winter 2014/2015 issue of Childview.​

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